THE EARLY YEARS CURRICULUM

The Huili Nursery Shanghai has been carefully designed and planned to meet the needs of pupils aged 2-6 years, with a focus on learning spaces to promote learning and development across various areas. We have brought together the very best frameworks to support effective Early Years education within the nursery.

The Early Years Curriculum

Huili Nursery Shanghai curriculum has been carefully designed and planned to meet the needs of pupils aged 2-6 years, with a focus on learning spaces to promote meaningful learning and development across various areas. The Wellington College China early years academic framework supports effective early years education within the nursery.

Research on successful outcomes of Early Years’ provision, both in the short term and for later.

A MIX OF ACTIVITIES

Within a whole day in the nursery, periods of free play (without adult involvement) meet our pupil’s need for space, independence and relaxation. Short sessions of carefully planned, structured activities are used to support the learning of specific knowledge and skills and are especially useful when building vocabulary for bilingual children or demonstrating how to use tools and equipment. Research has shown that children are born highly motivated, intelligent learners who actively seek interactions from those around them. To this end, we recognise that our pupils need plentiful opportunity to be able to socialise and interact with their peers, have periods of uninterrupted play and time to explore the world around them. Frustration arises when a child finally figures a challenge, task oractivity out and before they have a chance to try it out again, they are moved on to another activity. This inhibits a full understanding and doesn’t support our philosophy. Our pupils have time, support and encouragement from the team around them.

Children have built in exploratory tendencies and engage all their senses to investigate, discover, trial and master tools and resources at all stages of development. For young children, we appreciate that learning is both individual and social; our pupils are not passive learners, they enjoy hands on and brain-active activities. Children enthusiastically drive their own learning and development by the choices they make, the interests they develop, the questions they ask, the knowledge they seek and their motivation to act more competently. Children’s personal choices and interests are the driving force for building their knowledge, skills and understanding. Our indoor and outdoor learning spaces ignite pupil’s incentive to learn, with encouraging adults facilitating the desire to explore and investigate in more depth. Between them, the pupils fuel an ethos of shared thinking and learning. By working and playing with other people, children are constantly learning about themselves and their social and cultural worlds. Bilingual immersion helps pupils build positive identities through collaborative, caring relationships with others in the nursery. We also encourage our pupils to manage and take risks, have a go, experience success, developing mastery and ‘can do’ attitudes to life.

At Huili Nursery Shanghai, our practitioners have a significant role in building the right environment for learning. Most essentially, all adults in our nursery ensure that children feel known and valued as individuals, feeling safe and cared for. Every pupil’s personal stage of development is respected. Our pupils are not rushed, but supported and extended in ways that are right for them. Time in the nursery is managed so that pupils have an opportunity to become deeply involved in their activities and to follow their ideas through. Pupils may later return to continue their explorations or creative expressions. At Huili Nursery Shanghai, we see no need to rush; our pupils are exposed to quality experiences with depth of meaning. The early years practitioners manage the pace of activities, planning varied, interesting and new experiences to stimulate learning alongside opportunities for children to revisit, practise or enjoy a sense of mastery. With this groundwork in place, it is then the practitioners’ skilled interactions which will move learning forward.

Play engages children’s bodies, minds and emotions. In play, children can learn to interact with others and be part of a community. They experience and manage feelings, and learn to be in control and confident about themselves and their abilities. Play is known to help develop positive dispositions to learning:

  • Finding an interest
  • Being willing to explore, experiment and try things out
  • Knowing how and where to seek help
  • Being inventive – creating problems and finding solutions
  • Being flexible – testing and refining solutions
  • Being engaged and involved – concentrating, sustaining interest, persevering with a task, even when it is challenging
  • Making choices and decisions
  • Making plans and knowing how to carry them out
  • Playing and working collaboratively with peers and adults
  • Managing ‘self’ and managing others; understanding the perspectives and emotions of other people
  • Developing ‘can do’ orientations to learning
  • Being resilient – finding alternative strategies if things don’t go as planned

Babies and young children are powerful learners, reaching out in to the world and making sense of their experiences with other people, objects and events. As they explore and learn, children are naturally drawn to play. Play is recognised as so important to their wellbeing and development that the right to play is set down in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989) and play is a fundamental commitment of Huili Framework.

Huili Framework sets the standards that all Early Years’ providers must meet to ensure that children learn and develop well and are kept healthy and safe. It promotes learning to support children’s transition to school and gives children the broad range of knowledge and skills that provide the right foundation for good future progress throughout school and indeed, life. The Huili Framework provides sufficient flexibility for practitioners to follow children’s interests, respond to their ideas for developing play activities, and provides structured activities (which can also be playful) to teach specific knowledge and skills.

Huili Framework seeks to provide:

  • Quality and consistency in all Early Years’ settings, so that every child makes good progress and no child gets left behind
  • A secure foundation through learning and development opportunities which are planned around the needs and interests of each individual child and are assessed and reviewed regularly
  • Partnership working between practitioners and with parents and / or carers
  • Equality of opportunity and anti-discriminatory practice, ensuring that every child is included and supported

Babies and young children are powerful learners, reaching out in to the world and making sense of their experiences with other people, objects and events. As they explore and learn, children are naturally drawn to play. Play is recognised as so important to their wellbeing and development that the right to play is set down in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (1989).

Every child deserves the best possible start in life and the support that enables them to reach their full potential. Children develop quickly in the early years and a child’s experiences between birth and age five have a major impact on their future life chances.